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PJ1

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Everything posted by PJ1

  1. I used to possess these. NOS with funky patina. Sold to a buddy.
  2. This is awesome! I had a ‘81 GT bitd too and it was a killer bike.....Steve if you’re still chasing a blue Excaliber clamp I got you. Just drop me a line when it suits.
  3. Thanks for the invitation Steve.! Reserve a spot on your sofa please and I'll bring a 100 gallons of Vegemite, ha! It would be awesome that's for certain!
  4. It is SO impressive just how many people turned out with the somewhat ambiguity of the event happening. There were A LOT of people hanging out for this event to happen. Killer job as always S. Brothers. It seems you never fail to rise to the challenge. I bought 2 event tee's because they're bitchin' - good for me but I hope this helps out with site maintenance / repair costs too. Photo's?? Where do I look for them?? I need to see more, more, more dammit!
  5. And also the Redline Double Clamp stem......... And the Redline 16" Squareback (Pit)...............
  6. Yeah, I think Mark Mc is right. Later Mongoose bars had the pinched crossbar but were designed for a double clamp stem ( no bump). PJ1
  7. Not to derail this awesome thread but.... Truly, what happened to Oz's unpublished pics?? What's the story??
  8. Still for sale? If so, please PM me. Thank you. PJ
  9. I spy with my little eye - Jeff Bottema with the inside line, running equal third. I have no clue on the other dudes but I'm loving the fork, Brian is using too! PJ
  10. Love it. I just finished checking out the additional pics on FB. The all black look is as tough as nails and that fork is a mind blower. Great job as always, Rick. PJ
  11. The clamps are wrong for a Matthews Stem. Matthews clamps are square cornered and rectangular in shape. The clamps and bolts you have there are consistent with the stems that came on the Huffy's. There is a good chance that this is another variation of the Huffy stem which has been suggested as a possible Wald Double Clamp. Not confirmed though. PJ Still a cool little item, either way.
  12. I was just doing a bit of early morning fine tuning on one of my builds. In this instance I was doing a crank swap and thought it would be cool to take a quick shot of three early Takagi MX cranks that I have. I know for sure that the set in front of shot are the first gen. models due to them having "more meat" around the pedal spindle hole. These are also stamped "Takagi MX" but the stamping hasn't been hi-lighted in white, like the later versions. They are also finished in a different kind of black than the later ones. Following them are the more often seen chrome with "black filled" stamping and the ever popular black with "white filled" stamp. All have a center of crank stamp "T751". PJ
  13. I scourer the internet, forums and eBay all day and half of the night, in the hope of finding that elusive item or bargain. This time around I found a little of both, with a very tidy "buy it now" price. The listing was at the top of the page when I checked, so I think it had only been up for a minute or two. These puppies were incorrectly listed as a 1980's Redline V Bar but as soon as I saw the auction photo(s) I knew exactly what they were - so I pounced on them ! This is a lousy photo of the bars taken in the wee hours of the morning but these bars are in sensational condition with original finish, uncut, no road rash and no stem crimping. I will add some decent photos later today. I paid approximately 1/5th of the going rate for these - stoked !!!
  14. Just finished building these up over the weekend and thought I would add them to this thread. NOS Weinnman 20 x 2.125 Alloy Rims laced to NOS 12 gauge / .105 spokes and first gen. Shimano MX Hub for the front and All Black Bendix 76 in the rear. Moto Exotica Maximus! And fitted to my Redline. PJ
  15. I was digging through some old artwork folders and came across these zines my good buddy, Pat Dillon and I produced in the early 90's in Australia. I'm missing the very first copy but I know that I gave Pat all the first gen. drafts - so it won't be hard to have a fresh copy made up. It started out as very crudely put together medium but eventually evolved into a quite nice publication. I think we produced between a hundred and two hundred copies per issue and sold it for what it cost us to produce. It started off as a very "tongue in cheek" kind of publication but evolved into quite an informative and insightful view of BMX within Australia. It was very well received by the racers and their parents including 'officials' who we quite often would cut down to size! Great times travelling and recording the BMX happenings Australia wide but damn, it was a lot of hard work to produce. Here are 4 out of the 5 issue that we produced (if my memory is correct)! PJ
  16. Hey Guys, I'm looking to get a solid I.D. on these handlebars. I had a set of Dan Gurney bars on my 75 Gurney Monoshock and working from my more than lousy memory these are very similar in size and shape but I thought I would put it to the experts to determine. Plus I was pretty sure that my Gurney bars were nickel and these are chrome, I believe. These (like Gurney bars) have nice welds around the "sleeve" where the stem mounts. A photo from the rear of the bars made them appear like first gen Rascal bars - but the front on view (shown below) tends to contradict this. Anyhoo, I would appreciate any and all feedback that you have to offer Thanks in advance. PJ
  17. Very nice build, Aaron. Araya rims? Do you still talk with Pat - haven't seen him on the forums lately? PJ
  18. It looks to me that the small hole above the axle slot is for an axle retaining safety clip - should the axle nuts come loose, supposedly these clips are meant to hold the wheel in place. Found on almost every low end fork from bitd and to an extent - they are still being used on low end bikes today. I would be throwing those forks, Ben. Or better yet, finding someone that needs a no name fork and paying them forward for some good Karma. I like the bars but again my money is that they are an early no name (very low rise) BMX or possibly even MX bar. Nothing noteworthy about them but they might be worth hanging onto depending on what you are looking at building in the future. I hope this information is of some use to you. PJ
  19. Thanks for the go ahead, Steve - I’ll start with a bit of back story. Here’s the deal: So back in the late 80’s and early 90’s I was working at Australia’s premier all BMX store – PRM BMX Equipment. PRM stood for Pure Racing Machinery and was owned by my great friend and Australian BMX legend, Patrick Dillon. I had raced for PRM BMX briefly in the very early 80’s before leaving the team to open my own BMX shop but that’s its own story for another time! Anyhoo, in the early 1990’s apart from working at PRM I also did freelance Graphic Design for some of Australia’s biggest BMX brands at the time including Cassap Designs, Peddle Power Racing, Maxxim BMX Frames and Beyond BMX Clothing and of course PRM BMX Equipment - amongst others. I soon earned a bit of a reputation for producing some pretty cool artwork (for its’ time) within the Australian BMX community and somewhat within the Australian Bicycle Industry in general. In late 1992, after winning the National Title for my age bracket I also started my own BMX Company, Outlaw Racing Products and I did 99.5% of the artwork and 110% of everything else – but I digress. The Australian Torker connection: Sometime around 1994 I was approached by the Brand Manager for Torker Australia through Bikecorp (The Bicycle Corporation). Bikecorp was the licensee of the Torker Brand from SBS (Seattle Bike Supply) and they had asked me to redesign the Torker graphics for the new release domestic models . To say I was stoked is an understatement! I started thinking about the Torker Brand that I had grown up with. I had always liked their designs and I wanted to incorporate and in some way pay tribute to the original Torker Branding but making it contemporary at the same time . I started by hitting up my magazine collection and flicking through the pages to find Torker references and some fresh inspiration. Ideas started flowing and I took pen to paper and started sketching up some designs. I had to come up with designs which included a full frame artwork – head tube, top and down tubes, seat tube as well as pad sets and compact discs, even as far as the varying individual model designs. I had my hands full but I was relishing in it! Ultimately, I came up with what I thought was a decent end result and it was given the thumbs up by our domestic Torker Brand Manager.Bingo, we were on our way! I also went on to produce several other designs for the Orion brand BMX and MTB’s – Bikecorp’s lower end range of bikes. The release: . Soon enough the new domestic Torker range was released in Australia (with my designs) and they sold like hot cakes, with that particular Torker range still being a much sought after collectable for the current Australian Mid School community. Equipment for the task: Pencils, Pens, Paper, Pen Knife, Scissors, Spray Adhesive, Adhesive Vinyl and a Photocopier - Check! Please keep in mind that this artwork is over twenty years old and was 95% drawn by hand and 5% on computer - then ultimately rendered by computer with slight alterations. Torker Ellipse Logo Torker Top/Down Tube Design Torker Head Tube Design (badge) Torker Frame Pad Torker Stem Pad Torker Compact Disc Design Torker Race Model Designs Torker Freestyle Designs I went back about my business and continued on with Outlaw Racing Products and expanded the brand to include a range of safety equipment for BMX and those fruity MTB’ers! These items were very similar to RL Osborn’s Hammer Designs but Australian made and about 30 to 40 percent cheaper. And again, I digress with another story for another time! The US Torker relaunch: My understanding is that a couple of years later, SBS was so impressed with what the Australian’s had done not only with Torker sales but also my artwork that they “adopted” my Torker designs for their own late 90’s re-release of what we now refer to as the Mid School Torker range. In the late 90’s I was loving it! To pick up the latest issue of SNAP magazine and to see the US Torker adverts, frames, complete bikes, parts and accessories as well as the team riders emblazoned with my art was very cool and very special to me! At the time it didn’t really resonate with me the importance and to a degree the accomplishment of what I had achieved – a very small place in my own BMX history. So much so, that I never asked for so much as a decal, let alone a frame or bike to treasure and look back on. I think I still have the original hand drawn artwork tucked away (I’ll go and look for it now) it's a cool keepsake to be coupled with some packaged parts or whatever. Looking Back: I’m getting older as every day passes and now that I have two sons, I have been on the lookout for any Torker items with my art on them. Very slowly but surely I am collecting a few pieces to show my boys (who at 5 and 7 years old respectively, grapple with what I’m trying to explain to them!) just a small part of what their dad did in BMX and why I love the sport and now collecting hobby so much. PJ
  20. Thanks for the go ahead, Steve. I'm just gathering some pics to go with the story and should be able to post it up later today. PJ
  21. That is a thing of pure beauty, Joe. The original finish looks sensational! I too have a cast iron truing stand - the bad news is it was made in China (I think) and doesn't come close to the quality of yours. While I appreciate the technology in the likes of Park brand stands and similar - if you can't true and dish a wheel correctly using one of these, you should probably take up crochet - lol ! Killer pick up dude - now build up some nice wheels and put that puppy to use. Or - awesome conversation starter if you put it on your coffee table. PJ
  22. I also have a direct connection story to the SBS relaunch of the Torker brand in the mid to late 90's - but seeing as this thread is all about OG, I will save it for another time. PJ
  23. Here's one that I had in my collection for a while - but I'm really into the 1974-79 time period so I ended up moving it on to a collector who said he would keep it as it sits. Completely NOS 1981 Torker MX bike shop build. It was obvious that it was once a complete but probably had been raided for parts sometime during it's life. Wouldn't you love to walk into a bike shop today and see this bike with this price tag!!! PJ
  24. Nice Job on the restoration, robertlee - your Webco looks very cool. That's a beautiful blue color. PJ
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